Mozart’s The Magic Flute

Mozart’s The Magic Flute
7:30pm May 8 & 9, 2015    2:00pm May 10, 2015

a collaboration with UW School of Music.

Tickets: $65
Seniors: $40
Under 25: $25
Children 7 – 12 free with accompanying ticketed adult

One of Mozart’s crowning achievements, the Magic Flute is a potent alchemical mixture of popular music and theater with a depth of meaning that is still mysterious and controversial. The fact that Mozart had steeped himself in the music of Handel and Bach in the years leading up to Magic Flute makes it also a personal testament to his admiration for their art. Our production will combine an entirely new staging conception by stage director Dan Wallace Miller, with new dialogue by Karen Hartman, and with one of the reigning “Queen’s of the Night” in our time, Cyndia Sieden.

Hear GRAMMY winner Stephen Stubbs conduct Mozart’s beloved opera in Seattle’s first historically informed performance with a classical orchestra.

Sung in German with English supertitles. World premiere of new spoken dialogue in English by Karen Hartman.

Cast in order of appearance:

Tamino                                     Ross Hauck
Papageno                                 Geoffrey Penar
Pamina                                     Mary Feminear
The Queen of the Night              Cyndia Sieden
Papagena                                  Emma Grimsley
Sarastro                                    Colin Ramsey
First lady                                   Holly Boaz
Second Lady                             Celeste Godin
Third Lady                                Julia Benzinger
Monostatos                               Alasdair Elliott
Speaker of the temple               Matthew Scollin
Three Spirits                             Denna Good-Mojab, Michelle Bretl, Margaret Boeckman
Tenor Priest                              Pablo Piantino
Bass Priest                               Patrick Borror

 

Buy Tickets Here or call 206 543 4880

 

The Story:

Act 1

Tamino, a wealthy young prince in the bad part of town, is pursued by danger and rendered unconscious. Three Ladies, servants of Lady Starfire, the Queen of the Night, save him. They fawn over him, realizing he might be the solution to their Queen’s troubles. They run off to inform their Lady as Tamino awakens in the presence of Papageno, an eccentric local who collects birds for Lady Starfire. Tamino assumes Papageno saved him from danger, and Papageno happily takes credit. The Ladies reappear and gag Papageno so he cannot talk. They show Tamino a picture of Pamina, the Queen’s daughter, and he is immediately smitten. The Queen herself appears to Tamino and explains that her daughter has been kidnapped by the evil Sarastro, and that Tamino is her only hope of rescue. The Ladies give Papageno magic bells, allow him to speak again, and send him along with Tamino, to whom they give a magic flute.

Papageno becomes separated from Tamino and sees Pamina fleeing from the besotted Monostatos, a servant of Lord Sarastro. In the darkness, Monostatos mistakes Papageno for a hulking monster and flees. Papageno recognizes Pamina and tells her of Tamino’s love and noble rescue effort. Thus befriended, they leave together in search of Tamino.

Tamino is led by three helpful Spirits to the entrance of Sarastro’s domain. They tell him that in order to achieve victory in his task, he must become a man. Tamino attempts to gain entry into Sarastro’s domain, but is repelled by unseen voices. He is greeted by Sarastro’s Speaker, who questions his intentions. The Speaker informs him that he has been deceived and that the true evil is not Sarastro, but Lady Starfire. Tamino, dejected, plays his magic flute.

In the distance, Papageno and Pamina hear Tamino, who rushes off to find them. Papageno and Pamina are intercepted by Monostatos and his bevvy of minions, who threaten to enslave the both of them.  Papageno plays his magic bells. The charmed music drives off the villains, and they then find themselves in front of Sarastro. Pamina admits to Sarastro that she attempted escape, and Sarastro forgives her, saying that while she is not yet free, forcing Monostatos’ love upon her was wrong. Monostatos enters with Tamino in tow, and Sarastro congratulates him for catching the intruder before sending him off to be lashed. Sarastro orders Tamino be purified.

 

Act 2

Sarasto explains to his Company of followers that Tamino and Papageno must undergo the Trials in order to be taken into the Company. Pamina says her goodbyes to Tamino, who embarks on a dangerous journey that could lead to death. Papageno and Tamino are led to a chamber. A Priest tells Papageno that if he succeeds in his trials, Sarastro has the perfect mate for him: Papagena. The Priests tell the men that they must undergo a vow of silence and not speak, even to their intended loves. The Queen’s three ladies appear and try to talk sense into Papageno and Tamino, but are ignored.

Meanwhile, Monostatos lustfully sneaks into Pamina’s sleeping chamber, enraged with envy and self-loathing. The Queen appears and drives Monostatos off. She presents her daughter with a knife and commands her to murder Sarastro. Monostatos overhears and threatens to tell Sarastro of Pamina’s plans unless she submits to him. Sarastro enters and casts Monostatos out of his domain. Sarastro explains to Pamina that vengeance has no place in his kingdom.

The three Spirits come to Papageno and Tamino and give the men their magical instruments, which were taken by Sarastro. Pamina enters and is overjoyed to find Tamino, who, following the Priests’ commands, ignores her. Dejected and unloved, Pamina runs off. Papageno, out of boredom, plays his magic bells and muses about how much he’d like a girlfriend. A grotesque creature appears and tells Papageno that she is destined for him. He is incredulous, and she transforms into Papagena before disappearing.

Pamina, wracked with sorrow, attempts to kill herself with her mother’s knife. The three Spirits stop her and bring her to Tamino, who is undergoing the Trials.

Papageno, having blown it with Papagena, attempts suicide. The three Spirits stop him and tell him to play his magic bells. The bells make Papagena appear and the two gleefully embrace, with plans on spawning many little Papagenos.

With her and the magic flute’s help, Tamino and Pamina survive the trials. Monostatos leads the Queen of the Night and her three Ladies into Sarastro’s domain, where Sarastro captures them. The Company rejoices.

 

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